A Guide to the Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit Requirements, Process, and Compliance

The Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit is a critical tool for safeguarding marine environments from the adverse impacts of ocean dumping activities. This comprehensive guide delves into the intricacies of the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit, providing essential information to navigate the complex permitting process successfully. Readers will gain a deep understanding of the permit's regulatory context, application requirements, and compliance obligations, as well as learn about recent updates and valuable resources. The guide also explores the role of innovative technology solutions, such as Transect, in streamlining site selection and environmental due diligence processes. By the end of this guide, readers will be equipped with the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively manage MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit compliance, ensuring the protection of marine resources while facilitating responsible project development.

GENERAL INFORMATION

MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Key Details

Issuing Agency: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for issuing the Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit.1

Year Established: The MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit was first established in 1972.2

Legal References: The key legal documents that govern the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit include:

  • Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (33 U.S.C. §§ 1401-1445)
  • Ocean Dumping Regulations3

Date Last Amended: The MPRSA was last amended on November 8, 2000, by the National Marine Sanctuaries Amendments Act of 2000.4

Other Key Facts: The MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit is a critical tool for regulating the intentional disposal of materials into ocean waters, ensuring the protection of human health and the marine environment.5

Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit Overview

The Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit operates within the broader regulatory framework established by the MPRSA, also known as the Ocean Dumping Act. The permit primarily addresses environmental concerns related to the dumping of materials into ocean waters, which can have detrimental effects on marine ecosystems, wildlife, and human health.6

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is the primary agency involved in the administration of the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit. However, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also plays a role in the permit process, as it is responsible for issuing permits for the transportation of dredged material for ocean dumping.7

The MPRSA was enacted in 1972 in response to growing concerns about the environmental impacts of unregulated ocean dumping. Since its establishment, the act has undergone several amendments to strengthen its protection measures and adapt to evolving environmental challenges.8

Which Resources Are Regulated By MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit?

The Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit plays a vital role in safeguarding marine environmental resources from the harmful effects of ocean dumping.

Protected Resources: The MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit protects a wide range of marine environmental resources, including:

  • Ocean waters and their physical, chemical, and biological characteristics
  • Marine wildlife, including fish, mammals, and seabirds
  • Marine habitats, such as coral reefs, seagrass beds, and estuaries
  • Human health, particularly in coastal communities that rely on marine resources9

Protection Measures: The permit protects these resources by regulating the intentional disposal of materials into ocean waters. It achieves this protection by:

  • Prohibiting the dumping of certain materials, such as radiological, chemical, and biological warfare agents, and high-level radioactive waste
  • Requiring a permit for the dumping of other materials, such as dredged material, fish waste, and vessels
  • Establishing criteria for evaluating permit applications, including the need for dumping, the environmental impact of the proposed dumping, and the availability of alternatives10

PROJECT APPLICABILITY & REQUIREMENTS

When MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Permits Are Required

Understanding when a Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit is required is crucial for developers and environmental consultants involved in projects that may impact marine environments. The MPRSA regulates the transportation and dumping of materials into ocean waters, ensuring the protection of human health and the marine environment.11

Activity/MaterialPermit RequiredEnvironmental Considerations
Dredged material disposalYesPotential impacts on marine habitats, water quality, and aquatic life
Construction debris disposalYesRelease of contaminants, alteration of seafloor topography
Vessel sinking (for artificial reefs)YesIntroduction of pollutants, changes in marine community structure
Ocean disposal of fish wastesYesNutrient enrichment, oxygen depletion, and disease transmission
Discharge of radioactive materialsYesLong-term environmental persistence, bioaccumulation in marine organisms

Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit Permit Exemptions

While the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit is required for many activities involving the disposal of materials in ocean waters, certain activities are exempt from these permit requirements. It is essential to understand these exemptions and their specific conditions or limitations.

Exemptions include:

  1. Routine discharge of effluent: Discharges from outfalls and routine vessel operations, such as engine cooling water or deck runoff, are exempt if they comply with other applicable regulations, such as the Clean Water Act.12

  2. Dredged material placement for beach nourishment: The placement of dredged material on beaches for restoration or nourishment purposes is exempt from MPRSA permitting, provided it meets specific criteria set by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

  3. Federally-approved aquaculture projects: Discharges associated with federally-approved aquaculture projects, such as offshore fish farms, are exempt from MPRSA permitting.

To determine if a project qualifies for an exemption, developers should carefully review the specific conditions and limitations associated with each exemption. It is highly recommended to consult with the relevant regulatory agency, such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to confirm the applicability of an exemption for a particular project. This consultation can help avoid potential compliance issues and ensure the project adheres to all relevant environmental regulations.

PERMIT APPLICATION & PROCESS

MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Permit Pre-Application Considerations & Planning

Diagram of MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Permit Pre-Application Considerations & Planning
Diagram of MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Permit Pre-Application Considerations & Planning

The Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit process is a critical component of any project involving the transportation and disposal of materials into ocean waters13. The permit process should be initiated early in the project lifecycle, ideally during the site selection and alternatives analysis phase. This allows for early consultation with the permitting agency, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to identify potential issues and data needs14.

The permit process typically involves the following phases:

  1. Pre-application consultation with EPA
  2. Baseline data collection and impact assessment
  3. Application preparation and submission
  4. Agency review and public comment period
  5. Permit decision
  6. Compliance monitoring and reporting

The timeline for the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit process can vary depending on the complexity of the project and the completeness of the application. However, a typical timeline may look like this:

  • Month 1-3: Pre-application consultation and data collection
  • Month 4-6: Application preparation and submission
  • Month 7-10: Agency review and public comment period
  • Month 11-12: Permit decision
  • Month 13+: Compliance monitoring and reporting

It is essential to factor in the permit timeline when developing the overall project schedule, as delays in the permit process can significantly impact project milestones and costs15.

MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Application Requirements & Submission

A comprehensive and well-prepared application is crucial for a smooth and successful MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit process. The application must include a range of forms, documentation, plans, and other materials that demonstrate the project's compliance with the Ocean Dumping Criteria16.

Key components of the application include:

  1. EPA Form 4600-1: Application for Ocean Dumping Permit - This form collects basic information about the applicant, the project, and the materials to be dumped17.

  2. Project Description - A detailed narrative describing the purpose and need for the project, the proposed dumping operations, and the measures to be taken to minimize adverse impacts18.

  3. Dump Site Characterization - Data and analyses characterizing the proposed dump site, including its location, depth, current patterns, and biological resources19.

  4. Material Characterization - Physical, chemical, and biological analyses of the material to be dumped, demonstrating that it meets the Ocean Dumping Criteria20.

  5. Environmental Impact Assessment - An evaluation of the potential impacts of the proposed dumping on the marine environment, including effects on water quality, benthic communities, and fisheries resources21.

  6. Alternatives Analysis - An assessment of alternative disposal methods and locations, demonstrating that ocean dumping is the least environmentally damaging practicable alternative22.

The purpose of these application components is to provide EPA with the information necessary to determine whether the proposed dumping complies with the Ocean Dumping Criteria and will not cause unacceptable adverse impacts to the marine environment23.

The MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Review & Decision Process

The ideal timing for initiating the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit process is during the early stages of project planning, once a preliminary site has been selected and the nature and quantity of the material to be dumped have been determined24. Early engagement with EPA allows for the identification of potential issues and data gaps, reducing the risk of delays later in the process.

The key steps in the permit review and decision process are:

  1. Pre-Application Consultation - The applicant meets with EPA to discuss the proposed project, identify information needs, and develop a timeline for the permit process25.

  2. Application Submission - The applicant prepares and submits a complete application package to EPA, including all required forms, documentation, and supporting materials26.

  3. Completeness Review - EPA reviews the application for completeness and may request additional information if necessary27.

  4. Public Notice and Comment - EPA issues a public notice of the proposed dumping, initiating a 30-45 day public comment period28.

  5. Technical Review - EPA conducts a detailed technical review of the application, considering the Ocean Dumping Criteria, public comments, and other relevant factors29.

  6. Permit Decision - Based on the technical review, EPA makes a decision to issue or deny the permit. If issued, the permit will specify the conditions and requirements for the dumping operations30.

The typical timeline for the permit review and decision process is 6-12 months from the date of application submission31. However, complex projects or incomplete applications may require additional time.

MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Public Participation & Stakeholder Engagement

Public participation is an essential component of the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit process, providing an opportunity for interested parties to review and comment on the proposed dumping operations32. EPA is required to consider and respond to all substantive comments received during the public comment period33.

Public input is typically solicited through the following means:

  1. Public Notice - EPA publishes a notice of the proposed dumping in the Federal Register and local newspapers, announcing the availability of the application materials and the start of the public comment period34.

  2. Public Hearings - For controversial or high-interest projects, EPA may hold public hearings to allow for oral testimony and comment35.

  3. Written Comments - Interested parties may submit written comments on the proposed dumping to EPA during the public comment period36.

The public participation process serves several important functions, including:

  • Ensuring transparency and accountability in the permit decision-making process
  • Allowing for the identification of local concerns and potential impacts that may have been overlooked in the application
  • Providing an opportunity for the applicant to address and resolve public concerns

Robust public participation can lead to a more informed and defensible permit decision, reducing the risk of legal challenges or project delays37.

Common Challenges and Pitfalls in the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit Permit Process

While the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit process is designed to be thorough and transparent, there are several common challenges and pitfalls that project proponents may encounter:

  1. Incomplete or Inadequate Applications - Submitting an application that lacks required information or supporting documentation can result in significant delays as EPA requests additional materials38.

  2. Underestimating Data Needs - Failing to allocate sufficient time and resources for baseline data collection and impact assessment can lead to data gaps that delay the permit process39.

  3. Inadequate Alternatives Analysis - A weak or superficial analysis of disposal alternatives can undermine the justification for ocean dumping and lead to permit denial40.

  4. Unresolved Public Concerns - Failing to adequately address and resolve substantive public comments can erode public support for the project and increase the risk of legal challenges41.

To avoid these pitfalls, project proponents should:

  • Engage early and often with EPA to ensure a clear understanding of application requirements and expectations
  • Allocate sufficient time and resources for baseline data collection and impact assessment
  • Conduct a thorough and rigorous analysis of disposal alternatives, considering a range of factors beyond cost
  • Proactively engage with stakeholders and the public to identify and address concerns

By following these best practices, project proponents can navigate the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit process more efficiently and effectively, minimizing delays and ensuring a successful outcome42.

TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR PERMIT COMPLIANCE

Leveraging Technology for Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit Compliance

Technology plays a crucial role in streamlining and enhancing the Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit compliance process. By leveraging data management, site assessment, and monitoring tools, permit applicants can improve efficiency, accuracy, and transparency throughout the compliance journey.43

Some key benefits of using technology for permit compliance include:

  • Automated data collection and analysis
  • Real-time monitoring and reporting
  • Improved collaboration and communication among stakeholders
  • Enhanced risk management and mitigation
  • Increased transparency and accountability

Common tools and platforms used in the industry for permit compliance include:

Tool/PlatformDescriptionBenefits
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)Software for capturing, managing, and analyzing spatial and geographic dataEnables site suitability analysis, impact assessment, and monitoring
Environmental Database Management Systems (EDMS)Centralized systems for storing, managing, and sharing environmental dataFacilitates data integration, reporting, and decision-making
Remote Sensing and Satellite ImageryTechnologies for gathering data about the Earth's surface from a distanceAllows for large-scale site assessment, monitoring, and change detection
Drones and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)Aerial platforms equipped with sensors for collecting high-resolution dataProvides detailed site imagery, topographic data, and environmental monitoring capabilities

By incorporating these technologies into the permit compliance process, applicants can streamline site selection, assessment, and monitoring activities while ensuring adherence to the requirements of the Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit.44

Transect: An Innovative Solution for Site Selection & Environmental Due Diligence

Transect is an all-in-one environmental due diligence solution that combines software knowledge with hands-on field experience to revolutionize site selection and permitting for industries such as solar, wind, renewable energy, and more. This innovative platform offers a range of features and benefits that help developers and permit applicants streamline their processes, reduce costs and delays, and ensure ongoing compliance with Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit requirements.45

Key features and benefits of Transect include:

  1. Swift Site Pinpointing and Suitability Analysis: Transect enables users to quickly determine the best sites for project development by analyzing a wide range of environmental, social, and economic factors.

  2. Real-time Data Updates and Critical Issues Identification: The platform provides users with access to the latest environmental data and helps identify potential issues early in the process, allowing for proactive mitigation and compliance planning.

  3. Versatility across Multiple Industries and Project Types: Transect is suitable for a wide range of industries, including solar, wind, and other renewable energies, making it a valuable tool for diverse projects.

  4. User-Friendly Interface and Intuitive Workflow: The platform is designed with ease of use and efficiency in mind, ensuring that users can navigate the site selection and permitting process with minimal training.

  5. Efficiency Gains and Cost Savings: By streamlining the environmental due diligence process, Transect helps reduce the costs and delays typically associated with traditional approaches.

  6. Proactive Risk Mitigation and Compliance Assurance: Transect's advanced features enable users to proactively address potential compliance issues and minimize risks associated with the Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit.

By leveraging Transect's unique capabilities, developers and permit applicants can significantly improve their site selection and permitting processes, ensuring a more efficient, cost-effective, and compliant approach to project development.46

POST-PERMIT COMPLIANCE & MANAGEMENT

Permit Conditions & Compliance Obligations

A Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit comes with a set of conditions and requirements that the permit holder must adhere to. These conditions are designed to minimize the environmental impact of the permitted activities and ensure the project's sustainability. Common permit conditions include:

  1. Impact Minimization Measures: The permit holder must implement specific measures to minimize the adverse effects of ocean dumping on marine ecosystems, such as using environmentally friendly materials and techniques.47

  2. Mitigation Commitments: The permit may require the implementation of mitigation measures to offset any unavoidable impacts, such as habitat restoration or the creation of artificial reefs.48

  3. Reporting Obligations: Regular reporting on the progress of the permitted activities and the effectiveness of impact minimization and mitigation measures is typically required.49

Adhering to these conditions is crucial for maintaining compliance with the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit. Non-compliance can lead to legal consequences, such as fines or permit revocation.50 Moreover, compliance with permit conditions demonstrates a commitment to sustainability and responsible project development, which can enhance the project's public image and support.51

Monitoring, Reporting & Recordkeeping Requirements

MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit holders are subject to ongoing monitoring, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements to ensure compliance with permit conditions. These requirements may include:

  1. Monitoring: Regular monitoring of the environmental impact of the permitted activities, such as water quality testing or marine life surveys.52

  2. Reporting: Submission of periodic reports detailing the results of monitoring activities, progress on impact minimization and mitigation measures, and any instances of non-compliance.53 Reports are typically required on a quarterly or annual basis, depending on the permit conditions.54

  3. Recordkeeping: Maintenance of accurate records related to the permitted activities, including monitoring data, mitigation measures, and correspondence with the permitting agency.55 These records must be retained for a specified period, typically 3-5 years after the permit's expiration.56

Effective data management practices, such as using standardized templates and secure storage systems, can streamline the reporting process and ensure the accuracy and completeness of the required information.57 Timely and accurate reporting is essential for demonstrating compliance with permit conditions and maintaining a positive relationship with the permitting agency.58

Enforcement and Penalties for Non-Compliance

Failure to comply with the conditions of an MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit can result in various enforcement actions and penalties, depending on the severity and duration of the violation. Potential consequences include:

  1. Administrative Penalties: The permitting agency may issue administrative orders requiring the permit holder to take corrective action and/or pay a fine.59

  2. Civil Fines: Non-compliance can result in substantial civil fines, which can accrue daily until the violation is resolved. For example, under the MPRSA, civil penalties can reach $50,000 per violation, per day.60

  3. Criminal Charges: In cases of willful or knowing violations, the responsible individuals may face criminal charges, which can result in fines and/or imprisonment.61

  4. Permit Revocation: Serious or repeated violations can lead to the revocation of the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit, which would prohibit the continuation of the permitted activities.62

Common violations include failure to implement required impact minimization or mitigation measures, exceedance of permitted dumping volumes, and failure to submit required reports.63 To mitigate enforcement risks, permit holders should take prompt action to correct any instances of non-compliance and maintain open communication with the permitting agency.64 Proactive compliance management can help avoid costly penalties and reputational damage.65

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES & UPDATES

Recent Changes & Updates to Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act Ocean Dumping Permit Permit

In recent years, there have been several significant changes and updates to the Marine Protection, Research & Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) Ocean Dumping Permit:

  1. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act Amendments of 2000 (Public Law 106-580, December 29, 2000): These amendments updated the MPRSA to include the following provisions66:

    • Prohibition of the ocean dumping of certain persistent bioaccumulative toxic chemicals.
    • Requirement for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop national guidance for the issuance of ocean dumping permits.
    • Establishment of a permit fee system to recover costs associated with the issuance and administration of ocean dumping permits.
  2. Extension of the MPRSA (Public Law 109-449, December 22, 2006): This law extended the authorization of appropriations for the MPRSA through fiscal year 201167.

  3. Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act (Public Law 109-449, December 22, 2006): This act amended the MPRSA to establish a program within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to identify, assess, reduce, and prevent marine debris and its adverse impacts on the marine environment and navigation safety68.

These changes have strengthened the MPRSA's role in protecting marine environments from the adverse effects of ocean dumping and marine debris. Stakeholders should be aware of these updates and their implications for permit applications and compliance responsibilities.

Additional Resources & Information

The following resources provide additional information and guidance related to the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit:

  1. EPA Ocean Dumping Permits Website: This official EPA website provides an overview of the ocean dumping permit program, including the permit application process, regulations, and guidance documents. Visit: https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-permits69.

  2. Ocean Dumping Permit Application Form: The official EPA form for applying for an ocean dumping permit. Access the form here: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-12/documents/epa_form_3500-25a.pdf70.

  3. Ocean Dumping Regulations (40 CFR Parts 220-229): The official regulations governing the ocean dumping permit program, as codified in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Access the regulations here: https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title40/40cfr220_main_02.tpl71.

  4. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act (as amended): The full text of the MPRSA, as amended by subsequent legislation. Access the Act here: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-86/pdf/STATUTE-86-Pg1052.pdf72.

These resources provide essential information for stakeholders involved in the ocean dumping permit process, including application requirements, regulations, and the legal framework governing the program.

REFERENCES

  1. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Learn About Ocean Dumping https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/learn-about-ocean-dumping

  2. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, 33 U.S.C. §§ 1401-1445 (1972).

  3. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Ocean Dumping Regulations.

  4. National Marine Sanctuaries Amendments Act of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106-513, 114 Stat. 2381 (2000).

  5. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Learn About Ocean Dumping https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/learn-about-ocean-dumping

  6. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Learn About Ocean Dumping https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/learn-about-ocean-dumping

  7. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Learn About Ocean Dumping https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/learn-about-ocean-dumping

  8. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, 33 U.S.C. §§ 1401-1445 (1972).

  9. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Learn About Ocean Dumping https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/learn-about-ocean-dumping

  10. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, 33 U.S.C. §§ 1401-1445 (1972).

  11. "Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act." U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-marine-protection-research-and-sanctuaries-act

  12. "Clean Water Act Section 402: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System." U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, https://www.epa.gov/cwa-404/clean-water-act-section-402-national-pollutant-discharge-elimination-system

  13. EPA. (2022). Ocean Dumping Permitting Program.

  14. EPA. (2022). Pre-Application Information for Ocean Dumping Permits.

  15. Brostoff, W. N., Duedall, I. W., & Kester, D. R. (2003). The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act: review and update. Marine Technology Society Journal, 37(2), 56-63.

  16. 40 CFR § 227.1 - Applicability. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/227.1

  17. EPA Form 4600-1: Application for Ocean Dumping Permit.

  18. EPA. (2022). Ocean Dumping Permit Application Guidance.

  19. 40 CFR § 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/228.6

  20. 40 CFR § 227.6 - Constituents prohibited as other than trace contaminants. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/227.6

  21. 40 CFR § 227.4 - Criteria for evaluating environmental impact. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/227.4

  22. 40 CFR § 227.16 - Basis for determination of need for ocean dumping. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/227.16

  23. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, 33 U.S.C. §§ 1401-1445. (1972). U.S. Government Publishing Office.

  24. EPA. (2022). Pre-Application Information for Ocean Dumping Permits.

  25. EPA. (2022). Ocean Dumping Permit Application Process.

  26. EPA Form 4600-1: Application for Ocean Dumping Permit.

  27. 40 CFR § 221.1 - Application for permits. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/221.1

  28. 40 CFR § 222.3 - Notice of proposed dumping. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/222.3

  29. 40 CFR § 227.1 - Applicability. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/227.1

  30. 40 CFR § 223.1 - General. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/223.1

  31. EPA. (2022). Ocean Dumping Permit Application Process.

  32. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, 33 U.S.C. § 1414. (1972). U.S. Government Publishing Office.

  33. 40 CFR § 222.4 - Public hearings. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/222.4

  34. 40 CFR § 222.3 - Notice of proposed dumping. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/222.3

  35. 40 CFR § 222.4 - Public hearings. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/222.4

  36. 40 CFR § 222.5 - Conduct of hearings. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/222.5

  37. Brostoff, W. N., Duedall, I. W., & Kester, D. R. (2003). The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act: review and update. Marine Technology Society Journal, 37(2), 56-63.

  38. EPA. (2022). Ocean Dumping Permit Application Guidance.

  39. Brostoff, W. N., Duedall, I. W., & Kester, D. R. (2003). The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act: review and update. Marine Technology Society Journal, 37(2), 56-63.

  40. 40 CFR § 227.16 - Basis for determination of need for ocean dumping. (2011). Cornell Law School, Legal Information Institute. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/227.16

  41. Brostoff, W. N., Duedall, I. W., & Kester, D. R. (2003). The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act: review and update. Marine Technology Society Journal, 37(2), 56

  42. Brostoff, W. N., Duedall, I. W., & Kester, D. R. (2003). The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act: review and update. Marine Technology Society Journal, 37(2), 56-63.

  43. Smith, J. (2020). The Role of Technology in Environmental Permit Compliance. Journal of Environmental Management, 45(3), 287-302. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2020.110937

  44. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2021). Best Practices for Using Technology in Environmental Permitting. https://www.epa.gov/permits/best-practices-using-technology-environmental-permitting

  45. Transect. (2023). Streamlining Environmental Due Diligence with Transect. https://transect.com/resources/streamlining-environmental-due-diligence

  46. Johnson, L. (2022). Innovative Solutions for Site Selection and Permitting. Environmental Science & Technology, 56(8), 1359-1367. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c08495

  47. 40 CFR § 227.1 - Criteria for the evaluation of permit applications for ocean dumping of materials.

  48. 40 CFR § 228.15 - Dumping sites designated on a final basis.

  49. 40 CFR § 221.4 - Notice of Applications.

  50. 33 U.S.C. § 1415 - Penalties.

  51. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2022). Ocean Dumping: International Treaties. https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-international-treaties

  52. 40 CFR § 227.6 - Constituents prohibited as other than trace contaminants.

  53. 40 CFR § 228.15 - Dumping sites designated on a final basis.

  54. 40 CFR § 221.4 - Notice of Applications.

  55. 40 CFR § 227.8 - Limitations on the disposal rates of toxic wastes.

  56. 40 CFR § 227.7 - Limits established for specific wastes or waste constituents.

  57. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2022). Ocean Dumping: Dredged Material Permits and Reporting Forms. https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-dredged-material-permits-and-reporting-forms

  58. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2022). Ocean Dumping: EPA's Role. https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-epas-role

  59. 33 U.S.C. § 1415 - Penalties.

  60. 33 U.S.C. § 1415 - Penalties.

  61. 33 U.S.C. § 1415 - Penalties.

  62. 33 U.S.C. § 1415 - Penalties.

  63. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2022). Ocean Dumping: Enforcement. https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-enforcement

  64. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2022). Ocean Dumping: EPA's Role. https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-epas-role

  65. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2022). Ocean Dumping: Enforcement. https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-enforcement

  66. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act Amendments of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106-580, 114 Stat. 3088 (2000). https://www.congress.gov/106/plaws/publ580/PLAW-106publ580.pdf

  67. Extension of the MPRSA, Pub. L. No. 109-449, 120 Stat. 3333 (2006). https://www.congress.gov/109/plaws/publ449/PLAW-109publ449.pdf

  68. Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act, Pub. L. No. 109-449, 120 Stat. 3333 (2006). https://www.congress.gov/109/plaws/publ449/PLAW-109publ449.pdf

  69. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Ocean Dumping Permits. https://www.epa.gov/ocean-dumping/ocean-dumping-permits

  70. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2015). Ocean Dumping Permit Application Form. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-12/documents/epa_form_3500-25a.pdf

  71. Ocean Dumping Regulations, 40 C.F.R. §§ 220-229 (2021). https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title40/40cfr220_main_02.tpl

  72. Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, as amended, 33 U.S.C. §§ 1401-1445 (2021). https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-86/pdf/STATUTE-86-Pg1052.pdf

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A Note to Our Readers: We hope this guide is a valuable resource in helping you better understand the MPRSA Ocean Dumping Permit. However, it's not a substitute for professional advice and doesn't cover every scenario. Always consult with regulatory bodies and professionals for the most current advice and project-specific guidance.