A Guide to the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit Requirements, Process, and Compliance

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Generator Permit is a critical component of the federal regulatory framework governing the management of hazardous waste in the United States. This comprehensive guide provides an in-depth overview of the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit program, including its regulatory context, applicability, requirements, and compliance obligations. Whether you are a developer, environmental consultant, or other stakeholder involved in hazardous waste management, this guide will help you navigate the complex world of RCRA permitting and ensure that your projects and operations are in compliance with federal regulations. From pre-application considerations to post-permit compliance and monitoring, this guide covers all the essential aspects of the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit process, providing practical guidance and real-world examples to help you achieve your environmental goals.

GENERAL INFORMATION

RCRA HazGen Permit Key Details

Issuing Agency: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Year Established: 1976

Legal References: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 42 U.S.C. §6901 et seq.; 40 C.F.R. Parts 260-273

Date Last Amended: November 28, 2016 (Generator Improvements Rule)

Regulates: Generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous waste

Purpose: To ensure the safe management of hazardous waste from "cradle to grave"

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Generator Permit Overview

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Generator Permit is a critical component of the comprehensive federal regulatory framework governing the management of hazardous waste in the United States. Administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), this permit system was established in 1976 under the authority of the RCRA, which amended the Solid Waste Disposal Act of 1965. The primary focus of the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit is to protect human health and the environment by ensuring the safe and responsible handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous waste.

The EPA has developed a comprehensive set of regulations, codified in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Parts 260 through 273, which outline the requirements for hazardous waste generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs). Over the years, the EPA has amended these regulations to address emerging issues and strengthen the protection of public health and the environment. One of the most recent significant amendments was the Generator Improvements Rule, finalized on November 28, 2016, which aimed to clarify and streamline the requirements for hazardous waste generators.

Which Resources Are Regulated By RCRA HazGen Permit?

The RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit is designed to protect a wide range of environmental resources from the potential adverse impacts of hazardous waste. These resources include:

  1. Groundwater and Surface Water: Hazardous waste, if not properly managed, can contaminate groundwater aquifers and surface water bodies, posing significant risks to drinking water supplies, aquatic ecosystems, and recreational areas.

  2. Soil and Land: Improper storage, handling, or disposal of hazardous waste can lead to soil contamination, rendering land unsuitable for agricultural, residential, or recreational use and potentially endangering wildlife and human health.

  3. Air Quality: Certain hazardous wastes may emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or other toxic air pollutants, contributing to air pollution and potential respiratory health issues.

  4. Human Health: Exposure to hazardous waste through ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact can cause acute or chronic health effects, including cancer, birth defects, and organ damage.

The RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit achieves protection of these resources by requiring generators to properly characterize, label, package, and store hazardous waste; maintain accurate records; and ensure safe transportation and disposal at permitted TSDFs. These measures help prevent releases, minimize potential exposures, and ensure that hazardous waste is managed in an environmentally sound manner from the point of generation to ultimate disposal.

EPA Identification (ID) Number

The EPA Identification (ID) Number is a unique number assigned by the EPA or an authorized state agency to facilities that generate, transport, treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste. The primary purpose of the EPA ID Number is to track hazardous waste activities and ensure compliance with RCRA regulations. All hazardous waste generators, except for very small quantity generators (VSQGs), must obtain an EPA ID Number before treating, storing, disposing of, transporting, or offering for transportation any hazardous waste. Obtaining an EPA ID Number involves submitting EPA Form 8700-12 (Notification of Regulated Waste Activity) to the appropriate state or EPA regional office. Failure to obtain an EPA ID Number can result in enforcement actions and significant penalties.

Hazardous Waste Generator Permit

The Hazardous Waste Generator Permit is not a separate permit per se, but rather a set of requirements that hazardous waste generators must comply with based on their generator status. Hazardous waste generators are categorized as large quantity generators (LQGs), small quantity generators (SQGs), or very small quantity generators (VSQGs) based on the amount of hazardous waste they generate per month. Each generator category has specific requirements for waste management, storage, recordkeeping, and reporting. For example, LQGs must comply with more stringent requirements, such as developing a contingency plan and conducting personnel training, compared to SQGs and VSQGs. Generators must determine their status and comply with the applicable requirements to ensure proper management of hazardous waste and avoid potential enforcement actions.

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permit

Hazardous waste transporters are responsible for safely moving hazardous waste from the point of generation to permitted treatment, storage, or disposal facilities. Companies that engage in the transportation of hazardous waste must obtain a Hazardous Waste Transporter Permit from the EPA or an authorized state agency. To obtain a permit, transporters must demonstrate that they have the necessary expertise, equipment, and financial responsibility to safely transport hazardous waste in compliance with RCRA regulations. Transporters must also comply with manifesting requirements, spill response procedures, and recordkeeping obligations. Failure to obtain a Hazardous Waste Transporter Permit or comply with applicable regulations can result in significant penalties and potential liability for any releases or accidents that occur during transportation.

Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility (TSDF) Permit

Facilities that treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste are required to obtain a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility (TSDF) Permit from the EPA or an authorized state agency. The TSDF Permit is a comprehensive permit that establishes site-specific requirements for the design, construction, operation, monitoring, and closure of hazardous waste management units. To obtain a TSDF Permit, facilities must submit a detailed permit application, including a waste analysis plan, contingency plan, closure and post-closure plans, and financial assurance documentation. The permitting process involves extensive public participation and can take several years to complete. Once issued, TSDF Permits are valid for a maximum of 10 years and must be renewed to continue operations. TSDFs are subject to rigorous inspection and enforcement by regulatory agencies to ensure ongoing compliance with permit conditions and RCRA regulations.

Hazardous Waste Post-Closure Permit

Hazardous waste management facilities that have completed closure of their waste management units but still require ongoing monitoring, maintenance, or corrective action must obtain a Hazardous Waste Post-Closure Permit. The Post-Closure Permit ensures that the facility continues to protect human health and the environment after closure by addressing any remaining contamination or potential releases. The permit outlines the specific post-closure care requirements, such as groundwater monitoring, maintenance of waste containment systems, and reporting obligations. Post-Closure Permits are typically issued for a 30-year period but can be extended if necessary to ensure the long-term protection of human health and the environment. Facilities must demonstrate financial assurance for post-closure care and are subject to ongoing oversight by regulatory agencies until the completion of the post-closure care period.

PROJECT APPLICABILITY & REQUIREMENTS

When RCRA HazGen Permits Are Required

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Generator Permit requirements apply to facilities that generate hazardous waste, as defined in 40 C.F.R. Part 261. The type and quantity of hazardous waste generated determine the specific requirements that a facility must comply with under the RCRA regulations. The following table outlines the types of activities, actions, and materials that trigger the need for compliance with RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit requirements and the associated environmental considerations or potential impacts:

Activity/Action/MaterialEnvironmental Considerations or Potential Impacts
Generation of hazardous waste listed in 40 C.F.R. Part 261 Subpart DPotential for release of hazardous constituents to air, water, or soil; risk of human exposure; need for proper characterization, management, and disposal
Generation of characteristic hazardous waste (ignitable, corrosive, reactive, or toxic) as defined in 40 C.F.R. Part 261 Subpart CPotential for release of hazardous constituents to air, water, or soil; risk of human exposure; need for proper characterization, management, and disposal
Accumulation of hazardous waste on-sitePotential for release of hazardous constituents to air, water, or soil; risk of human exposure; need for proper containment, labeling, and inspection
Treatment of hazardous waste on-sitePotential for release of hazardous constituents to air, water, or soil; risk of human exposure; need for proper treatment standards and air emission controls
Transportation of hazardous waste off-sitePotential for release of hazardous constituents during transport; risk of human exposure; need for proper packaging, labeling, and manifesting
Disposal of hazardous waste off-sitePotential for release of hazardous constituents at the disposal facility; risk of human exposure; need for proper disposal at a permitted facility

RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit Exemptions

While the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit requirements apply to most facilities that generate hazardous waste, certain activities and waste streams are exempt from these requirements. It is essential for facilities to carefully evaluate their waste generation activities and consult with the relevant regulatory agency to determine if an exemption applies to their specific situation. The following is a list of specific exemptions from the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit requirements:

  1. Household Hazardous Waste: Hazardous waste generated by households is exempt from RCRA regulations, as long as it is not mixed with regulated hazardous waste. [40 C.F.R. §261.4(b)(1)]

  2. Agricultural Waste: Waste pesticides disposed of on a farmer's own property in compliance with the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) are exempt from RCRA regulations. [40 C.F.R. §262.70]

  3. Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) Waste: CESQGs that generate less than 100 kg of hazardous waste per month and less than 1 kg of acute hazardous waste per month are exempt from most RCRA requirements, provided they comply with certain conditions. [40 C.F.R. §261.5]

  4. Scrap Metal: Scrap metal that is recycled is exempt from RCRA regulations, provided it is not contaminated with hazardous waste or exhibits a hazardous characteristic. [40 C.F.R. §261.6(a)(3)(ii)]

  5. Used Oil Filters: Non-terne plated used oil filters that have been properly drained are exempt from RCRA regulations. [40 C.F.R. §261.4(b)(13)]

  6. Solvent-Contaminated Wipes: Wipes contaminated with certain solvents that are managed according to the conditions specified in 40 C.F.R. §261.4(a)(26) are exempt from RCRA regulations. [40 C.F.R. §261.4(a)(26)]

To determine if a project qualifies for an exemption, facilities should carefully review the specific conditions and limitations outlined in the RCRA regulations and any applicable state regulations. It is highly recommended that facilities consult with the EPA or the appropriate state regulatory agency to confirm the applicability of an exemption to their specific waste generation activities. This consultation can help ensure compliance and avoid potential enforcement actions.

PERMIT APPLICATION & PROCESS

Common Challenges and Pitfalls in the RCRA HazGen Permit Process

Generators may encounter several common challenges and pitfalls during the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit process. These can include:

  1. Misclassification of Waste Streams: Generators may inadvertently misclassify their waste streams, leading to incorrect generator status determinations and non-compliance with applicable regulations. To avoid this, generators should thoroughly characterize their waste streams using knowledge of the waste and/or analytical testing. 1
  2. Inadequate Waste Management Procedures: Generators may fail to implement adequate waste management procedures, such as proper labeling, storage, and recordkeeping. This can result in violations and potential enforcement actions. Generators should develop and follow a comprehensive hazardous waste management plan that outlines all required procedures and responsibilities. 2
  3. Lack of Employee Training: Generators may fail to provide adequate training to their employees on hazardous waste management requirements and procedures. This can lead to improper handling of waste and potential violations. Generators should ensure that all employees involved in waste management receive initial and annual training as required by the regulations. 3
  4. Incomplete or Inaccurate Recordkeeping: Generators may struggle with maintaining complete and accurate records of their waste management activities, such as manifests, biennial reports, and training documentation. This can result in violations and difficulties demonstrating compliance during inspections. Generators should establish a robust record-keeping system and regularly review and update their records. 4
  5. Failure to Update Generator Status: Generators may fail to update their generator status when their waste generation quantities change, leading to non-compliance with applicable requirements. Generators should regularly review their waste generation quantities and notify the EPA or state agency if their status changes. 5

To overcome these challenges and avoid common pitfalls, generators should:

  • Conduct thorough waste characterizations and maintain accurate waste determination records
  • Develop and implement a comprehensive hazardous waste management plan
  • Provide initial and annual training to all employees involved in waste management
  • Establish a robust record-keeping system and regularly review and update records
  • Regularly review waste generation quantities and update generator status as needed
  • Consult with the EPA or state agency for guidance and clarification on regulatory requirements

By following these best practices and staying informed about regulatory changes, generators can navigate the RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit process more effectively and maintain compliance with the regulations.

TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR PERMIT COMPLIANCE

Leveraging Technology for RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit Compliance

Technology plays a crucial role in streamlining and enhancing RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit compliance by improving data management, waste characterization, and monitoring processes. By leveraging advanced tools and platforms, generators can increase efficiency, accuracy, and transparency in their permit compliance efforts. Some of the key benefits of using technology for RCRA compliance include:

  1. Automated Waste Tracking: Software solutions can help generators track and manage their hazardous waste from cradle to grave, ensuring accurate record-keeping and timely reporting. 6
  2. Electronic Manifests: The EPA's e-Manifest system allows generators to electronically create, sign, and transmit manifests, reducing paperwork and improving data accuracy. 7
  3. Waste Characterization Tools: Analytical software and databases can assist generators in properly characterizing their waste streams based on chemical composition and regulatory criteria. 8
  4. Compliance Monitoring: Digital tools can help generators monitor their compliance status, track deadlines, and receive alerts for potential violations or required actions. 9
  5. Data Integration: Technology platforms can integrate data from various sources, such as waste manifests, analytical results, and inspection reports, providing a comprehensive view of compliance status. 10

The following table summarizes some common tools and platforms used in the industry for RCRA compliance:

Tool/PlatformDescriptionBenefits
Waste Management SoftwareComprehensive solutions for tracking, managing, and reporting hazardous waste activitiesAutomated record-keeping, deadline tracking, and compliance monitoring
Electronic Manifest (e-Manifest) SystemEPA's national system for electronically tracking hazardous waste shipmentsReduced paperwork, improved data accuracy, and real-time tracking
Waste Characterization DatabasesOnline resources providing information on waste codes, regulatory requirements, and treatment standardsAccurate waste characterization and reduced risk of misclassification
Compliance Monitoring AppsMobile applications for tracking compliance tasks, deadlines, and inspection findingsReal-time compliance monitoring and improved task management
Data Integration PlatformsSolutions for integrating data from multiple sources and generating comprehensive compliance reportsHolistic view of compliance status and improved data accessibility

By leveraging these technologies, generators can streamline their RCRA compliance processes, reduce the risk of violations, and demonstrate their commitment to environmental stewardship.

Transect: An Innovative Solution for Site Selection & Environmental Due Diligence

Transect is an all-in-one environmental due diligence solution that combines software knowledge with hands-on field experience to revolutionize site selection and permitting for industries such as solar, wind, renewable energy, and more. By offering a comprehensive suite of tools and services, Transect helps developers and permit applicants streamline their processes, reduce costs and delays, and ensure ongoing compliance with environmental regulations, including RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit requirements.

Key features and benefits of Transect include:

  1. Swift Site Pinpointing and Suitability Analysis: Transect's advanced algorithms and geospatial data enable users to quickly identify and assess potential sites based on environmental, technical, and regulatory criteria. 11
  2. Real-Time Data Updates and Critical Issues Identification: The platform continuously updates its data sources and alerts users to any changes or potential issues that may impact site suitability or permit compliance. 12
  3. Versatility Across Multiple Industries and Project Types: Transect's flexible framework can be adapted to various industries and project types, from renewable energy to infrastructure development. 13
  4. User-Friendly Interface and Intuitive Workflow: The software's intuitive design and streamlined workflow make it easy for users to navigate the site selection and permitting process, even without extensive technical expertise. 14
  5. Efficiency Gains and Cost Savings: By automating key tasks and providing real-time insights, Transect helps users save time and money compared to traditional due diligence methods. 15
  6. Proactive Risk Mitigation and Compliance Assurance: Transect's predictive analytics and compliance monitoring features help users identify and mitigate potential risks before they become significant issues, ensuring ongoing compliance with RCRA and other environmental regulations. 16

By leveraging Transect's unique capabilities, developers and permit applicants can enhance their site selection and permitting processes, minimizing the risk of delays, cost overruns, and compliance violations. The software's comprehensive approach to environmental due diligence ensures that users have the information and tools they need to make informed decisions and navigate the complex landscape of RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit requirements.

POST-PERMIT COMPLIANCE & MANAGEMENT

RCRA HazGen Permit Conditions & Compliance Obligations

A RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit comes with a set of conditions and requirements that generators must adhere to in order to maintain compliance. These conditions are designed to minimize the environmental impacts of hazardous waste generation and ensure the safe management of waste from cradle to grave. Some typical permit conditions and compliance obligations include:

  1. Waste Characterization: Generators must accurately characterize their waste streams to determine if they are hazardous and, if so, which hazardous waste codes apply. 17
  2. Generator Status Determination: Generators must determine their generator status (VSQG, SQG, or LQG) based on the quantity of hazardous waste generated per month. 18
  3. Waste Management Practices: Generators must comply with specific requirements for hazardous waste accumulation, storage, labeling, and disposal based on their generator status. 19
  4. Emergency Preparedness: LQGs must develop and maintain a contingency plan and emergency procedures to minimize the impacts of any releases or accidents. 20
  5. Training: LQGs must provide initial and annual training to personnel involved in hazardous waste management. 21
  6. Recordkeeping and Reporting: Generators must maintain accurate records of waste characterization, manifests, biennial reports (for LQGs), and other required documentation, and submit reports to the EPA or state agency as required. 22

Understanding and adhering to these permit conditions is crucial for maintaining compliance and avoiding enforcement actions. Generators should regularly review their permit requirements and ensure that all personnel involved in hazardous waste management are aware of and follow the applicable conditions.

RCRA HazGen Monitoring, Reporting & Recordkeeping Requirements

RCRA Hazardous Waste Generators are subject to ongoing monitoring, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements to demonstrate compliance with their permit conditions. These requirements vary depending on the generator's status (VSQG, SQG, or LQG) but generally include:

  1. Waste Characterization Records: Generators must maintain records of waste characterization, including test results, waste analysis data, and supporting documentation, for at least three years. 23
  2. Manifests: Generators must prepare and maintain hazardous waste manifests for all off-site shipments of hazardous waste and retain copies for at least three years. 24
  3. Biennial Reports (LQGs only): LQGs must submit biennial reports to the EPA or state agency by March 1 of even-numbered years, summarizing their hazardous waste activities for the previous year. 25
  4. Exception Reports: Generators must file exception reports with the EPA or state agency if they do not receive a copy of the manifest from the designated facility within the specified timeframe. 26
  5. Training Records (LQGs only): LQGs must maintain records of employee training, including the job title, job description, type and amount of training provided, and dates of training, for current personnel and at least three years after an employee leaves the company. 27

Accurate and timely reporting is essential for demonstrating compliance with RCRA requirements. Generators should establish a robust system for tracking, managing, and retaining required records and ensure that reports are submitted to the appropriate agencies by the specified deadlines. Failure to comply with monitoring, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements can result in enforcement actions and penalties.

Enforcement and Penalties for Non-Compliance with RCRA HazGen

Non-compliance with RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Permit conditions can result in various enforcement actions and penalties, depending on the severity and duration of the violation. The EPA and state agencies have the authority to enforce RCRA requirements through administrative, civil, and criminal proceedings. Potential consequences of non-compliance include:

  1. Administrative Penalties: The EPA or state agency may issue administrative orders requiring generators to correct violations and pay penalties of up to $37,500 per day per violation. 28
  2. Civil Fines: The EPA may seek civil penalties through judicial action, with fines of up to $37,500 per day per violation. 29
  3. Criminal Charges: Knowing violations of RCRA requirements can result in criminal charges, with penalties of up to $50,000 per day per violation and/or imprisonment for up to five years. 30
  4. Permit Revocation: In severe cases, the EPA or state agency may revoke a generator's permit, effectively shutting down their operations until compliance is achieved. 31

Common violations that can lead to enforcement actions include:

  • Failure to properly characterize hazardous waste
  • Improper storage or labeling of hazardous waste
  • Failure to maintain required records or submit reports
  • Inadequate emergency preparedness or training (for LQGs)
  • Illegal disposal or treatment of hazardous waste

To mitigate enforcement risks, generators should promptly address any identified violations, communicate with the EPA or state agency about corrective actions, and maintain detailed records of compliance efforts. Proactive compliance management and cooperation with regulatory agencies can help minimize the potential for enforcement actions and penalties.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES & UPDATES

Recent Changes & Updates to RCRA HazGen Permit

Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (effective May 30, 2017) [^50^]

The Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule, published on November 28, 2016, and effective on May 30, 2017, made several key changes to the RCRA hazardous waste generator regulations, including:

  • Allowing VSQGs to send hazardous waste to LQGs under the control of the same person
  • Providing flexibility in hazardous waste determinations and generator category determinations
  • Enhancing emergency preparedness and response requirements for SQGs and LQGs
  • Revising labeling and marking requirements for hazardous waste containers and tanks

Electronic Manifest (e-Manifest) System Launch (effective June 30, 2018) [^51^]

The EPA launched the electronic Hazardous Waste Manifest (e-Manifest) system on June 30, 2018. The e-Manifest system allows generators, transporters, and TSDFs to electronically create, sign, transmit, and store hazardous waste manifests, streamlining the process and reducing paper waste.

Hazardous Waste Pharmaceuticals Rule (effective August 21, 2019) [^52^]

The Hazardous Waste Pharmaceuticals Rule, published on February 22, 2019, and effective on August 21, 2019, established new regulations for the management of hazardous waste pharmaceuticals by healthcare facilities and reverse distributors. The rule aims to provide a more streamlined approach to managing hazardous waste pharmaceuticals while ensuring environmental protection.

These regulatory changes and updates have significant implications for hazardous waste generators, requiring them to review and update their hazardous waste management practices to maintain compliance with the revised regulations.

Additional Resources & Information

  1. EPA RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator Regulatory Summary: This EPA webpage provides a comprehensive overview of the RCRA hazardous waste generator regulations, including key definitions, generator categories, and regulatory requirements.
  2. EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule: This EPA website provides information and resources related to the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule, including fact sheets, frequently asked questions, and the final rule text.
  3. EPA Hazardous Waste Manifest System: This EPA website provides information and resources related to the Hazardous Waste Manifest System, including the e-Manifest system, manifest forms, and user guides.
  4. EPA Hazardous Waste Pharmaceuticals Rule: This EPA website provides information and resources related to the Hazardous Waste Pharmaceuticals Rule, including fact sheets, frequently asked questions, and the final rule text.
  5. EPA RCRA Online: This searchable database provides access to EPA interpretations of RCRA regulations, including memoranda, letters, and guidance documents.

These resources provide valuable information and guidance for hazardous waste generators seeking to understand and comply with the RCRA regulations. Generators should also consult with their state environmental agencies for any state-specific requirements that may apply.

[^50^]: 81 Fed. Reg. 85732 (Nov. 28, 2016) [^51^]: 83 Fed. Reg. 420 (Jan. 3, 2018) [^52^]: 84 Fed. Reg. 5816 (Feb. 22, 2019)

REFERENCES

  1. 40 C.F.R. §262.11(a)

  2. 40 C.F.R. §262.17(a)

  3. 40 C.F.R. §262.17(a)(7)

  4. 40 C.F.R. §262.40(a)

  5. 40 C.F.R. §262.18(e)

  6. EPA. (2022). Hazardous Waste Management Facilities and Units. https://www.epa.gov/hazardous-waste-management-facilities-and-units

  7. EPA. (2023). E-Manifest. https://www.epa.gov/e-manifest

  8. EPA. (2022). Waste Characterization. https://www.epa.gov/waste-characterization

  9. EPA. (2022). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Compliance Monitoring. https://www.epa.gov/rcra-compliance-monitoring

  10. EPA. (2022). Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System (e-Manifest). https://www.epa.gov/hazardous-waste-electronic-manifest-system

  11. Transect. (2023). Site Selection. https://www.transect.com/site-selection

  12. Transect. (2023). Environmental Data. https://www.transect.com/environmental-data

  13. Transect. (2023). Industries. https://www.transect.com/industries

  14. Transect. (2023). Platform Overview. https://www.transect.com/platform

  15. Transect. (2023). Case Studies. https://www.transect.com/case-studies

  16. Transect. (2023). Environmental Compliance. https://www.transect.com/environmental-compliance

  17. 40 C.F.R. §262.11

  18. 40 C.F.R. §262.13

  19. 40 C.F.R. §262.14, §262.16, §262.17

  20. 40 C.F.R. §262.250 - §262.265

  21. 40 C.F.R. §262.17(a)(7)

  22. 40 C.F.R. §262.40, §262.41

  23. 40 C.F.R. §262.11(f), §262.40(a)

  24. 40 C.F.R. §262.40(b)

  25. 40 C.F.R. §262.41(a)

  26. 40 C.F.R. §262.42

  27. 40 C.F.R. §262.17(a)(7)(iv)

  28. EPA. (2022). RCRA: Enforcement and Compliance. https://www.epa.gov/rcra/rcra-enforcement-and-compliance

  29. 42 U.S.C. §6928(g)

  30. 42 U.S.C. §6928(d)

  31. 40 C.F.R. §270.43

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A Note to Our Readers: We hope this guide is a valuable resource in helping you better understand the RCRA HazGen Permit. However, it's not a substitute for professional advice and doesn't cover every scenario. Always consult with regulatory bodies and professionals for the most current advice and project-specific guidance.